ABOUT US  |  CONTACT US  |  RSS  |  ARCHIVE  |  2020-09-18  |  UPDATED: 1399/06/28 - 17:38:3 FA | AR | EN
Qamishli residents call for removal of US, Turkish occupation forces from Syria            South Africa says ‘surprised’ by ‘bizarre’ report of Iran plot to kill US envoy            President Maduro: EU demand to delay election in Venezuela ’impossible’            UAE cracking down hard on anti-Israel sentiment with 10-year prison sentences: Dissident            India building tunnel in Himalayas to get soldiers to Chinese border in 10 minutes             FBI warns of ’combustible violence’ on US streets ahead of November election             Trump’s Former NSA says withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan is an unwise policy             US Embassy warns of extremist attacks against women            Afghanistan, Tajikistan discuss Afghan peace, bilateral trade and economic ties            Asian, European markets sink after US Fed warning of ’uncertain’ outlook            China files formal complaint with US over senior official visiting Taiwan            Can US Electoral College survive another disputed election?             Top aides to Pompeo grilled at Congress over US arms sales to Saudi Arabia             Gunmen fire 55 shots, killing at least two in Philadelphia            UAE, Bahrain activists highlight public resentment of deals with Israel            


DATE PUBLISHED: 1398/11/19 - 13:55:3
VISIT: 354
SHARE WITH YOUR FRIENDS

Watch Your Step

Why the 10,000 daily goal is built on bad science.

Getty Images.

In recent years, the 10,000-steps-a-day regime has become entrenched in popular culture. You can barely walk down the street without someone stomping past you wearing a FitBit; when Jeremy Hunt was health secretary, he was often pictured with his poking out from his shirtsleeves. It has become a global obsession: the research firm Gartner estimated that by 2020 there will be 500m wearables adorning consumers across the world.

This is all despite the fact that 10,000 steps is a completely arbitrary figure, one that originates from a successful Japanese marketing campaign in the mid-60s. In an attempt to capitalise on the immense popularity of the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, the company Yamasa designed the world’s first wearable step-counter, a device called a manpo-kei, which translates as "10,000-step meter".

"There wasn’t really any evidence for it at the time," says Prof David Bassett, head of kinesiology, recreation and sport studies at the University of Tennessee. "They just felt that was a number that was indicative of an active lifestyle and should be healthy."

A research team at Kyushu University of Health and Welfare began to investigate the potential benefits of taking 10,000 steps. They concluded that the average Japanese person took between 3,500 and 5,000 steps a day, and that if these people increased their daily step count to 10,000, they could decrease their risk of coronary artery disease.

But while the World Health Organization, the American Heart Foundation and the US Department of Health & Human Services have all gradually adopted 10,000 steps as a daily activity recommendation, in recent years the veracity of this number has been increasingly called into question. In 2018, Mike Brannan, national lead for physical activity at Public Health England declared: "There’s no health guidance that exists to back it."

Indeed, most of the scientific studies that have been conducted to try to test whether 10,000 steps a day is optimal for health are themselves relatively arbitrary. They simply compare people who have done 10,000 steps a day with those who have done far lower numbers, such as 3,000 or 5,000, and then measure calories burned, blood pressure and blood glucose levels.

"This number keeps being reinforced because of the way research studies are designed," says Prof Catrine Tudor-Locke of the Center for Personalized Health Monitoring at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. "So, the study might find that 10,000 helps you lose more weight than 5,000 and then the media see it and report: ‘Yes, you should go with 10,000 steps,’ but that could be because the study has only tested two numbers. It didn’t test 8,000, for example, and it didn’t test 12,000."

For those who are chronically ill, have type 2 diabetes, or older individuals who are used to a more sedentary lifestyle, there are now concerns that making a rapid jump to 10,000 steps a day could have adverse consequences. For others, the milestone may seem intimidating and can derail intentions to increase daily physical activity.

"We know that sedentary lifestyles are bad, and if you’re taking fewer than 5,000 steps a day on average this can lead to weight gain, increase your risk of bone loss, muscle atrophy, becoming diabetic and this litany of issues," Tudor-Locke says. "But, at the same time, there seems to be an obsession about 10,000 and how many steps are enough, yet it’s more important, from a public health point of view, to get people off their couches. The question we should really be asking is: how many steps are too few?"

Some studies investigating the protective nature of exercise against chronic illnesses ranging from heart disease to stroke and various forms of cancer, such as breast cancer and reproductive cancers, suggest that somewhere between 6,000 and 8,000 steps could be the lower boundary to aim for.

"Six thousand steps and above is getting you into that range of what these studies are showing and is protective against cardiovascular disease, in particular," Bassett says. "And for people who have elevated risk factors to begin with, this can cause an improvement in those risk factors."

Scientists who have attempted to calculate an exact number of steps that equate to the public health guidelines of 30 minutes of moderate exercise per day, have found that we should perhaps aim for a minimum of 7,500 steps.

But while the rise of the step-counter industry has led to a generation of fitness lovers fixated on achieving 10,000 steps, there is also currently no known upper ceiling on how much is good for us. Exercise scientists are currently trying to conduct studies to see whether 15,000 or even 18,000 steps have long-term health benefits over the traditional 10,000 benchmark.

Scientists who have studied the Amish people in rural Canada, who use no motorised forms of transport, have found that they average 14,000-18,000 steps a day, while a study of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes from the mid-90s found that those who averaged about 19,000 steps a day had far better outcomes compared with those who remained largely sedentary.

One of the major problems with the 10,000-steps-a-day goal is that it doesn’t take into account the intensity of exercise. Getting out of breath and increasing your heart rate may well be even more important than the exact number of steps taken. Researchers are currently conducting studies to see whether people who take 10,000 steps a day merely by pottering around their house achieve the same health benefits as those who do so by brisk walking or playing sport.

"More recently, scientists have started looking at cadence, which is the idea of step rate or frequency of stepping," Tudor-Locke says. "When intensity’s better, your heart is pounding a little faster, more blood goes through your body, things are crossing the cell wall that need to; all these things are happening quicker."

In June of 2018, Tudor-Locke published some of the first findings on this, in a paper titled How fast is fast enough? It suggested that a minimum of 100 steps per minute is required for exercise to be beneficial. "This is the kind of pace which you naturally ascend to when you’re doing purposeful walking," she says. "But this is just the beginning of this area of research: looking at how healthy people are not just by how many steps they’ve taken, but the rate at which they’ve done it."


SOURCE: The Guardian

 

LINK: https://www.ansarpress.com/english/13757


TAGS:






*
*

*



SEE ALSO

NATURE SHOULDN’T BE A ’WHITE SPACE’: WHY I STARTED A BLACK GIRLS CAMPING TRIP


Surprising Ways to Beat Anxiety and Become Mentally Strong–According to Science


The Case Against Stretching


Rejuvenate and reset with Ayurveda in Kerala


Japanese businessman pays $1.8 for an enormous tuna


The World’s First 360-Degree Rooftop Infinity Pool Is Coming to London in 2020


10 Irresistible Smoothies to Make Right Now


A dark day in New Zealand / Video


Imam Ali (A.S.) and the Holy Quran


Israeli Chief Rabbi Calls Black People ’Monkeys’





VIEWED
MOST DISCUSSED




POLL

Modi, Merkel Discuss Afghanistan, Radicalisation And Terrorism

SEE RESULT


LAST NEWS

EU parliament urges arms embargo on Saudi Arabia over Khashoggi murder, Yemen war

Qamishli residents call for removal of US, Turkish occupation forces from Syria

South Africa says ‘surprised’ by ‘bizarre’ report of Iran plot to kill US envoy

President Maduro: EU demand to delay election in Venezuela ’impossible’

UAE cracking down hard on anti-Israel sentiment with 10-year prison sentences: Dissident

India building tunnel in Himalayas to get soldiers to Chinese border in 10 minutes

FBI warns of ’combustible violence’ on US streets ahead of November election

Trump’s Former NSA says withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan is an unwise policy

US Embassy warns of extremist attacks against women

Afghanistan, Tajikistan discuss Afghan peace, bilateral trade and economic ties

Asian, European markets sink after US Fed warning of ’uncertain’ outlook

China files formal complaint with US over senior official visiting Taiwan

Can US Electoral College survive another disputed election?

Top aides to Pompeo grilled at Congress over US arms sales to Saudi Arabia

Gunmen fire 55 shots, killing at least two in Philadelphia

UAE, Bahrain activists highlight public resentment of deals with Israel

Mexico asks US for info about reported abuse of migrants, hysterectomies

Venezuela blasts UN rights report as ‘riddled with falsehoods’

Hurricane Sally swamps US Gulf Coast with massive floods, ’unreal’ rain

Palestinian resistance groups know no red lines in war with Israel: Islamic Jihad leader

US attorney general calls for sedition charges against anti-racism protesters

Libya’s Prime Minister Sarraj says will resign by end of next month

After failure at UN, US says will work to hinder arms trades with Iran with its own action

Biden, Trump trade barbs over vaccine as US pres. contradicts top experts

Turkey ‘open to constructive dialog’ with Greece in maritime dispute

Germany to take in 1,500 more Lesbos island migrants

No Ceasefire Until Cause of War is Discussed: Taliban Spokesman

Foreign Minister to Discuss Trade and Transit Development with Tajikistan

India coronavirus cases cross 5 million in ‘worse-than-sci-fi’ pandemic

Iran sees a big change in mining with gold prospecting

Russia to sell 100mn doses of COVID-19 vaccine to India

Rouhani congratulates Iranians on assured victory against US over sanctions snapback

ICE nurse raises alarm over medical care at detention center; Pelosi demands probe

UN war crimes panel urges Turkey to rein in allied militants in N Syria

13 detained after fire near second Greek refugee camp

Myanmar army admits to ‘possible wider patterns’ of violence against Rohingya

Turkey complains Greece militarizing Chios; extends drilling activity off Cyprus

Japan’s lower house of parliament elects Yoshihide Suga as prime minister

Thousands of Oregon evacuees shelter from wildfires as US disaster declared

Iran complains to UN over Trump’s military threat, stresses right to self-defense


MEDICAL NEWS


ANSAR PRESS ©  |  ABOUT US  |  CONTACT US  |  MOBILE VERSION  |  LINKS  |  DESIGN: Negah Network Co.
All right reserved. Use this website by mentioning the source (link) is allowed. ÝÑæԐÇå ÇیäÊÑäÊی äÚáÈäÏÇä