ABOUT US  |  CONTACT US  |  RSS  |  ARCHIVE  |  2020-11-30  |  UPDATED: 1399/09/10 - 10:41:2 FA | AR | EN
Trump to add Chinaís SMIC and CNOOC to defense blacklist: Sources            Eight Saudis killed in Yemeni ballistic missile attack against coalitionís positions            UAE, Jordan condemn assassination of Iranian scientist             Afghan pilot told to rejoin air force or leave US protection             Heratís Obe District Police Chief Killed in Ambush             Deadly Humvee bomb targets public protection unit in Ghazni             Suicide attacker targets Zabulís provincial council head             Leader Urges Punishment for Assassins of Iranian Scientist             Revenge for Assassination of Fakhrizadeh on Agenda: IRGC Chief             Severe revenge for scientistís assassination put on Iranís agenda: IRGC chief             US appeals court rejects Trump campaignís Pennsylvania election case             Macron calls police beating of black man Ďshamefulí in face of rising protests             Trump retweets Israeli journalistís message praising assassination of Iranian scientist             US closes 10 bases as part of Ďmurkyí withdrawal process             Prominent Iranian physicist assassinated near Tehran: Defense Ministry            


DATE PUBLISHED: 2017/5/27 - 12:47:09
VISIT: 2862
SHARE WITH YOUR FRIENDS

At Ramadan, group pushes positive images of Muslims
At Ramadan, group pushes positive images of Muslims

As a medical doctor in Westland, Dr. Mahmood Hai has treated thousands of patients in Michigan and helped develop a new technique with lasers to treat prostate enlargement that has helped more than 1 million patients.

What motivates him is his faith: Islam.

“My religion was my main driving force because in God’s eyes, every human being on this Earth is equal,” said Hai, 70, a urologist. “Whether he’s rich or poor, white or black, African or Indian, whatever, in God’s eyes, they’re all the same.”

Hai is one of many doctors in Michigan who are Muslim and contributing a lot to society, according to a new report released this month by the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding, a think tank started by Muslims in Michigan with offices in Dearborn and Washington, D.C.

Dr. Mahmood Hai on Tuesday, May 23, 2017, at his medical

As Ramadan, a holy month of fasting and spiritual reflection, starts today for Muslims around the world, the report seeks to educate the public with stories of success in Michigan.

The report estimates the number of Muslim medical doctors in Michigan could be more than 15%, as well as more than 10% of the state’s pharmacists. There are 35 Muslims in Michigan who hold public office, and more than 700 attorneys in the state are Muslim, the report said. It also detailed Muslim contributions in other areas such as business and technology.

“We …  reveal important and oftentimes overlooked contributions by Muslims to the state,” says the report, written by doctoral student Rebecca Karam of the City University of New York.

The study comes during an anxious time when some Muslims and immigrants feel under attack. Hai, an immigrant from India who has lived in the U.S. since 1973, says that many patients speak highly about their personal doctors who happen to be Muslim, but might not make the connection when they hear about Islam and Muslims in general.

“If you ask a lot of patients, they may say, my doctor is phenomenal, he saved my life, and he spends the whole night with me in the ICU saving my life, and he happens to be Muslim,” Hai said. “But when it comes to looking at Islam and Muslims, they forget the guy who spent the whole night saving his life or the one who did his surgery is of the faith of Islam.”

Titled “An Impact Report of Muslim Contributions to Michigan,” the study includes empirical data to showcase Muslim accomplishments, but cautions some of the figures are estimates.

Determining the population percentages of Muslim doctors in Michigan was derived by looking at a database of names of doctors statewide and comparing that to a list of names that sound Muslim, the report says. The list of Muslim names came from Muslim communities and groups, including the Council on American-Islamic Relations. It said the Muslim names were of various ethnicities, including Arab, west African, Eastern European and others. The report cautioned that some doctors with names that sound Muslim could be non-Muslim, and there might be other Muslim doctors without Muslim-sounding names.

Another doctor featured in the report is Dr. Farha Abbasi, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Michigan State University, who works on mental health issues among Muslims. She established the Muslim Mental Health Conference and is managing editor for the Journal of Muslim Mental Health.

“Muslim mental health has become this movement, everybody wants to talk about it,” Abbasi said. But “we are so behind in the research.”

Young Muslims are facing unique stresses because of negative views about them, she said.

“From that young age, you’ve been bombarded by negative messages … you feel this sense of insecurity, uncertainty.”

Abbasi said that some Muslim Americans start to question: “How much of a Muslim can I be? How much of a visible Muslim can I be? How much of a practicing Muslim can I be?”

The report hopes to show that Muslims can be open about their faith while serving their communities.

Hai started doing research in the 1990s for a new technique using lasers to reduce a common condition afflicting men: enlarged prostate gland.

Of the established procedure, known as TURP (transurethral resection of the prostate), Hai said, “I felt it was a very traumatic technique and involved pain, getting hospitalized, with a catheter, bleeding, pain. … I felt that we should do some research to find some better ways. So I started doing research with lasers.”

It eventually got FDA approval and “since then, I’ve been doing the procedures and teaching it around the world. I’ve taught thousands of urologists in nearly 30 different countries.”

Born in India to a medical doctor who once served a former president there, Hai moved to Detroit in 1975 for a medical residency at Wayne State University before starting his urology practice. He said his family has always believed in serving the community where you live.

 

LINK: https://www.ansarpress.com/english/6763


TAGS:






*
*

*



SEE ALSO

Iranian and Afghan medical universities sign MoU to strengthen relations


British coronavirus vaccine: Human trials to include 10,000


Oxford-based pharmatech company uses artificial intelligence to find drug against COVID-19


Coronavirus: WHO warns against íimmunity passportsí for recovered patients


US Open likely to be played in front of fans despite COVID-19 outbreak


Iran ramps up production of coronavirus test kits


Herat Lab Lacks COVID-19 Test Kits


A UK consortium hopes to soon be making at least 1,500 ventilators a week


Loss of taste and smell key COVID-19 symptoms, app study finds


32 New Cases of COVID-10 in Afghanistan, Total 74





VIEWED
MOST DISCUSSED




POLL

Modi, Merkel Discuss Afghanistan, Radicalisation And Terrorism

SEE RESULT


LAST NEWS

4 French police officers charged over black manís abuse; 2 in custody

Trump to add Chinaís SMIC and CNOOC to defense blacklist: Sources

Eight Saudis killed in Yemeni ballistic missile attack against coalitionís positions

UAE, Jordan condemn assassination of Iranian scientist

Afghan pilot told to rejoin air force or leave US protection

Heratís Obe District Police Chief Killed in Ambush

Deadly Humvee bomb targets public protection unit in Ghazni

Suicide attacker targets Zabulís provincial council head

Leader Urges Punishment for Assassins of Iranian Scientist

Revenge for Assassination of Fakhrizadeh on Agenda: IRGC Chief

Severe revenge for scientistís assassination put on Iranís agenda: IRGC chief

US appeals court rejects Trump campaignís Pennsylvania election case

Macron calls police beating of black man Ďshamefulí in face of rising protests

Trump retweets Israeli journalistís message praising assassination of Iranian scientist

US closes 10 bases as part of Ďmurkyí withdrawal process

Prominent Iranian physicist assassinated near Tehran: Defense Ministry

Contradictory statements on developments in peace talks

Americaís security is not hinged on the number of troops on the ground: Pompeo

Latam women march to demand end to domestic violence

India draws rebuke from Beijing over ban on more Chinese apps

Russia denounces Pompeoís visit to occupied Golan as Ďprovocationí

Biden urged to extend US-Russia START treaty, limit deployed nuclear arms

Americans defy pandemic as US COVID cases set new record

Ten Australian soldiers fired after release of war crimes report

Iran swaps Israelís spy for three nationals jailed abroad

Argentina soccer legend Maradona dies of heart attack, his lawyer says

Car crashes into gate of German Chancellor Merkelís office

Yemen stresses right to self-defense as Saudi Arabia resorts to UN over Aramco raid

Pakistan, India accuse each other of sponsoring terrorism at UN

Trump plans to pardon former aide Michael Flynn

Rights watchdog appeals for urgent help for Bamiyan victims

Car bomb in Kandahar leaves 17 wounded

More than 70 killed or wounded across Afghanistan in under 24 hours

Germany Starts Reducing Troops in Kunduz: Report

Saffron flower harvesting process underway in Helmand

US Committed to Enduring Partnership with Afghanistan: Pompeo

An Online Prayer Meeting for Religious People Around the World to End COVID-19

Ten nominee ministers secure votes of confidence

Djokovic beats Zverev to reach semis at ATP Finals

Turkish president, Saudi monarch talk bilateral relations ahead of G20 summit


MEDICAL NEWS


ANSAR PRESS ©  |  ABOUT US  |  CONTACT US  |  MOBILE VERSION  |  LINKS  |  DESIGN: Negah Network Co.
All right reserved. Use this website by mentioning the source (link) is allowed. ›—ś‘ź«Ś «یš —š ی šŕŠ»šŌ«š