ABOUT US  |  CONTACT US  |  RSS  |  ARCHIVE  |  2021-10-16  |  UPDATED: 1400/06/27 - 17:12:4 FA | AR | PS | EN
PIA runs first chartered commercial flight to Afghanistan             Afghan Education Ministry to Modify Curriculum             6 in 10 Americans say US ígone off on wrong trackí: Poll             US Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman: America would work with Taliban on Daesh-K             US lawlessness, Europe inaction responsible for status quo surrounding JCPOA: Iran FM             After Ida, small recovery signs amid daunting destruction             McConnell: Biden not going to be removed from office             Fighting Continues Between Taliban, Resistance Forces             Taliban Expected to Announce New Govt Soon             Biden Defends Decision to Withdraw From Afghanistan             Taliban accuse US of destroying equipment including helicopters             Qatar warns isolating Taliban could further destabilize Afghanistan             India announces first formal meeting with Taliban             Pentagon: China will soon surpass Russia as top nuclear threat             US warns citizens to Ďimmediatelyí leave Kabul airport            


DATE PUBLISHED: 1399/08/10 - 09:53:5
VISIT: 1138
SHARE WITH YOUR FRIENDS

Fears of transition íchaosí if Biden defeats Trump


This combination of pictures created on October 30, 2020 shows Democratic presidential nominee and former Vice President Joe Biden waves to supporters before speaking at a Drive-In rally at Dallas High School, in Dallas, Pennsylvania, on October 24, 2020, and US President Donald Trump arrives to hold a Make America Great Again rally as he campaigns in Gastonia, North Carolina, October 21, 2020. (AFP photo)

Donald Trump said on the campaign that he wants a "smooth, beautiful transition" after Election Day, but he offered an ambiguous follow-up caveat: "But itís got to be an honest vote."

For months, the US president -- who on Tuesday will battle Joe Biden at the polls to win another four years in the White House -- has planted seeds of doubt about the legitimacy of the election.

The Republican incumbent has questioned the validity of mail-in ballots, demurred on whether he will accept the results if he loses to the veteran Democrat, and been vague about what a transition to his rival would look like.

The transition between election and inauguration is a quirk of American politics: the more than two-month gap is particularly long.

After a campaign marked by its unrelenting nastiness, and amid a health crisis of a magnitude never before seen in modern times, what would a transition from Trump to Biden look like?

What happens during the transition?

During a presidential transition, the team entering the White House -- though they still donít have the keys -- prepares to take power alongside the outgoing administration.

In the words of Martin Anderson, author of "Revolution: The Reagan Legacy," itís a time of "delicious chaos."

The Center for Presidential Transition has prepared a how-to guide for government agencies that summarizes the enormity of the task at hand:

-- Staffing the White House and the Executive Office of the President

-- Making more than 4,000 presidential appointments, about 1,200 of which require Senate confirmation

-- Learning the ins and out of more than 100 federal agencies

-- Preparing the first 100 days of the new administration

Biden has put in place a transition team that, following tradition, is raising funds to be able to get up and running.

According to Politico, it hopes to have at least $7 million in hand by Election Day, and a staff of at least 350 people by Inauguration Day in January 2021.

How will Trump act if he loses?

Itís hard to say what the 45th president of the United States will do if he loses to Biden.

The question has forced observers to look back at what the 74-year-old Trump has said in recent months -- and whether to take him at his word or assume some of those comments were for shock value.

For veteran political analyst Larry Sabato at the University of Virginia, that "depends heavily on the margin of Bidenís victory (assuming he wins)."

"If Trump loses by a wide margin, he will grumpily do the minimum to pass the torch to Biden," Sabato told AFP.

If the result is close, all bets are off and anything -- even violent protest -- is possible, the expert added.

If the last four years are any indication, some observers say, there is cause for concern.

A coalition of 12 non-governmental organizations wrote to the National Archives to express their fears.

"We are alarmed and deeply concerned by the Trump administrationís failure to honor its legal responsibility to create and preserve records," they said in a letter.

It remains an open question what Trump would do in the final 77 days of his administration if he loses. History is full of examples of controversial presidential pardons during the so-called "lame duck" period.

Tradition and tensions

US law stipulates that the incoming president should have wide access to whatever is needed during the transition, but of course, some of that depends on the goodwill of the ousted administration, especially the president.

Sometimes, the heat of the campaign is hard to forget.

One anecdote remains the stuff of Washington lore: during the transition from Bill Clinton to George W. Bush in late 2000 and early 2001, the letter "W" was damaged or removed from numerous White House computer keyboards...

When Bush ceded the Oval Office to Barack Obama in 2009, the transition was smooth and gracious, despite the vastly different politics of the two men. Of course, that is easier when the president leaving had two terms in office.

"When a president is doing transition planning at the end of eight years in the presidency, it is easier to begin the planning well ahead of time," said Martha Kumar, a presidential scholar and head of the White House Transition Project.

"Additionally, it becomes part of the departing presidentís legacy so he has a stake in doing a good job."

Among recent one-term presidents, George H.W. Bush stands out for his poise in handing over to Clinton. His letter to the Democrat who defeated him is often cited as one of the most elegant and gracious.

"Dear Bill... I wish you great happiness here. I never felt the loneliness some Presidents have described," Bush wrote.

"Iím not a very good one to give advice; but just donít let the critics discourage you or push you off course," he said.

"Your success now is our countryís success. I am rooting hard for you. Good luck."

If Trump loses, will he leave a letter for Biden? And what will it say?

(Source: AFP)

LINK: https://www.ansarpress.com/english/21008


TAGS:






*
*

*



SEE ALSO

6 in 10 Americans say US ígone off on wrong trackí: Poll


McConnell: Biden not going to be removed from office


Pentagon: China will soon surpass Russia as top nuclear threat


5-year-old boy shoots 3-year-old girl in US state of Minnesota


Advocacy groups demand Facebook remove AIPACís Islamophobic attack ads against Ilhan Omar


Poll: Majority of parents in US against school vaccine mandates


Viral video shows Washington DC officer repeatedly punching black man


US to review 9/11 files after victimsí families disinvited Biden from memorial over Saudi cover-up


California wildfire now second-worst in state history


Fauci warns of Ďworse variantí if COVID allowed to keep mutating in unvaxxed





VIEWED
MOST DISCUSSED




POLL

Modi, Merkel Discuss Afghanistan, Radicalisation And Terrorism

SEE RESULT


LAST NEWS

UN seeks $600 million to avert Afghanistan humanitarian crisis

PIA runs first chartered commercial flight to Afghanistan

Afghan Education Ministry to Modify Curriculum

6 in 10 Americans say US ígone off on wrong trackí: Poll

US Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman: America would work with Taliban on Daesh-K

US lawlessness, Europe inaction responsible for status quo surrounding JCPOA: Iran FM

After Ida, small recovery signs amid daunting destruction

McConnell: Biden not going to be removed from office

Fighting Continues Between Taliban, Resistance Forces

Taliban Expected to Announce New Govt Soon

Biden Defends Decision to Withdraw From Afghanistan

Taliban accuse US of destroying equipment including helicopters

Qatar warns isolating Taliban could further destabilize Afghanistan

India announces first formal meeting with Taliban

Pentagon: China will soon surpass Russia as top nuclear threat

US warns citizens to Ďimmediatelyí leave Kabul airport

US strikes Daesh after deadly Kabul attack

Panjshir: Massoud Wants to Talk But Ready to Fight

UK says has evacuated over 7,000 people from Afghanistan

OIC holds emergency meeting on Afghanistan

RSF presses Biden to evacuate journalists

Taliban to unveil new Afghan govt framework within weeks, official says

Greece completes wall extension on border as Afghan migrant fears grow

Biden Vows to íMobilize Every Resourceí for Evacuations

Afghan Women to Taliban: íInclude Us In Your Govtí

Taliban seeks intíl assistance for rebuilding Afghanistan

EUís Borrell says Taliban takeover of Afghanistan biggest event since Crimea

Pentagon DOES NOT KNOW how many Americans are still in Afghanistan, or how many were among the 7,000 evacuated so far

Terrorist blast kills at least two people in Somali capital

Taliban call on the world to recognize their movement

Turkey Still Aims to Maintain Kabul Airport Security: Erdogan

IMF Blocks Afghanistanís Access to Emergency Reserves

Taliban Says Governing Structure May Include Council

Biden seeks ways to speed up evacuations from Afghanistan

Afghan Female Journalists Ask Taliban for Right to Work

Biden should take peopleís money seriously and question Afghan military top brass (including Ghani) who gave them orders not to fight Taliban

Ghaniís remarks spark widespread reaction

Afghan delegation meets with Pakistanís prime minister

Ross Wilson says reports of US embassy closing are not true

Taliban spokesman Mujahid holds first press conference in Kabul


MEDICAL NEWS


ANSAR PRESS ©  |  ABOUT US  |  CONTACT US  |  MOBILE VERSION  |  LINKS  |  DESIGN: Negah Network Co.
All right reserved. Use this website by mentioning the source (link) is allowed. ›—ś‘ź«Ś «یš —š ی šŕŠ»šŌ«š